Silver and Gold – a quick raid on Batsford Arboretum

We’ve been waiting for winter with bated breath. Insanely mild temperatures have tempted flowers and shoots out, causing horticultural pessimists to shake their heads and mutter.

Winter at last? Looking down from the hills near Batsford to Moreton-in-Marsh

Winter at last? Looking down from the hills near Batsford to Moreton-in-Marsh, swathed in silver

And lo! A couple of days ago the skies cleared, the wind dropped and the temperature plummeted to… well, about -3C. I know this won’t impress my Norwegian and Canadian friends, but here in the Cotswolds it was heady stuff. I was supposed to be doing paperwork and housework that afternoon, so of course I grabbed my camera and went out.

The golden Cotswold Stone of Batsford House, erstwhile home of gilded youth (the Mitford sisters)

The golden Cotswold Stone of Batsford House, erstwhile home of gilded youth (the Mitford sisters)

Batsford Arboretum is only ten minutes away from our house, and, what’s more, entry is free to RHS members at this time of year. As soon as I arrived I knew I was investing my time wisely. There was no wind, not the slightest puff. It was quiet, so quiet that all I could hear were the flitterings and cheepings of birds. A raven cronked heavily from the top of a Sequioadendron giganteum and the sound must have carried all the way to Stow-on-the-Wold.

Just inside the entrance there was a smattering of Helleborus, Eranthis hyemalis, and Cyclamen coum. So far, so wintery. But then I saw a large shrub splashed with gold – hang on a minute, surely those flowers were a bit early? “Aren’t those flowers a bit early?” said the one other visitor, “What is it?”  “Erm, yes… oh it’s a Genista,” I replied casually (not admitting that I’d just checked the label).

Genista 'Porlock'

Genista ‘Porlock’

Further on down the path lay a host of golden daffodils. Wait! What? Yes, a blithering host of them. In January. In fact as I walked on I could see that quite a few varieties of Narcissus were in full flower, and not just the ones in the most sunny positions either. I was so distracted by them that I slipped on a slope and only saved my camera at the cost of muddy trousers and my dignity.

Fluttering and dancing a bit on the early side.

Fluttering and dancing a bit on the early side.

 

I’m pretty sure this is the first time I’ve seen kingcups (Caltha palustris) flowering in a frozen pond in January. You’ll be glad to hear I was careful not to fall over again.

Impatient kingcup

Impatient kingcup

Round the corner I found the less surprising Hamamelis mollis ‘Boskoop’. A goldcrest fluttered among the golden shred flowers – I held my breath and willed the autofocus to work faster. This was the only shot I got, those goldcrests are speedy little blighters. Still, slightly blurry is better than nothing.

Goldcrest co-ordinating with Hamamelis mollis 'Boskoop'

Goldcrest co-ordinating with Hamamelis mollis ‘Boskoop’

Hydrangea paniculata 'Kyushu'

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’

By this time I was in full Fotherington-Thomas “Hello trees! Hello sky!” mode. The air was clear, the sky was blue and all around me tree and shrub treasure was glittering. Hydrangea paniculata in particular was showing its winter value in the low rays of sun.

 

Hydrangea paniculata 'Limelight'

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Limelight’

Even the drive was gilded with moss

Even the drive was gilded with moss

 

Silvery satellite above Batsford branches

Silvery satellite above Batsford branches

As I left the arboretum a silver moon stood high above the bare branches and the sun dropped like a golden penny into the ridge of the Cotswolds above Bourton-on-the-Hill.

 

The penny drops

The penny drops

 

I knew that the next night would bring a heavier frost.

The following morning, despite the lure of my filing cabinet, I was off up the hill again.

Frost in Batsford village

Frost in Batsford village

 

Many of the daffs had fainted in the frost

Many of the daffs had fainted in the frost

 

Double silver. Frost on the hairy buds of Magnolia 'Caerhays Belle'

Double silver. Frost on the hairy buds of Magnolia ‘Caerhays Belle’

 

Blue and silver. Frosty magnolia buds.

Blue and silver. Frosty magnolia buds.

This time it was noisier. There were dog walkers chatting. Chatting! Why weren’t they studying the fluffy silver buds of the Magnolia? Or sniffing the Daphne? Some of them were actually chatting to their dogs. Apparently it was one dog’s birthday. The dogs took no notice, they were busy scaring off the birds. I went a little more off the beaten track but the frozen ground meant that birds heard me crunching miles away. The best I managed was a blurry treecreeper, complacent in his camouflage. So I concentrated on less mobile subjects. Hamamelis, Cornus and Parrotia persica were providing constellations of colour.

Hamamelis x intermedia 'Diane'

Oh, Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Diane’

Hamamelis x intermedia 'Moonlight'

Gimme the Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Moonlight’

Fire magic - Hamamelis x intermedia 'Feuerzauber'

Fire magic – Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Feuerzauber’

Starry, starry day - Cornus officinalis

Starry, starry day – Cornus officinalis

Parrotia persica embroidering the clear sky

Parrotia persica embroidering the clear sky

As the midday sun burned away the frost I walked back to the café and used coffee and cake to put off my return home a little longer.

Silver and gold - an unequal battle between sunshine and frost

Silver and gold – an unequal battle between sunshine and frost

I’m glad I did, there’s more mild weather on the way – there may be no more silver-gilt on our gingerbread this winter.

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7 thoughts on “Silver and Gold – a quick raid on Batsford Arboretum

  1. What a delightful account of a couple of winter walks, even though the abundance of early blooms seem just a little premature : / I’m very happy to hear your mistep was minor…Have had similar distracted moments in gardens…somehow the feet get momentarily forgotten! Love your photos… The Goldcrest seems perfectly colour coordinated with the bloom of the Hamamelis he’s perched on…It looks like they have quite a collection of Hamamelis…I’ve seen ‘Diane’, but not ‘Feuerzauber’ or ‘Moonlight’. You are so lucky to have such a place within a short walk… Thanks for sharing : )

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    • Thanks Jo, yes, it’s not the first time I’ve come a cropper!
      This was the first time I noticed ‘Feuerzauber’, even though its label says it was planted in 2000. I think I was just lucky that the light was hitting it just right as I passed by, and it’s a good example of a well-named plant.
      With all the tempting goodies on the internet it’s easy to forget that there is wonder on our doorsteps 🙂

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      • Funny how one can visit a place over and over, and not really notice an aspect of it, until, as you say, the light happens to be just right…Part of the magic of gardens perhaps, always in transition… Any of us are really fortunate to have places like this so close by…

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  2. A feast of photos Harriet. Thanks for sharing. Oh, those poor daffodils though. Hope they recovered. My favourite is the goldcrest- perfectly colour co-ordinating with the hamamelis. A joy.

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  3. Fabulous images Harriet. I do love a good winter garden, it inspires me to get outside in the fresh air and we’ve had so few of those crisp sunny days. The goldcrest is beautiful, could it have found a better place to pose?

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    • Thanks Jessica, it almost seemed like that goldcrest had chosen the Hamamelis deliberately to torment me – it was there for quite a while but I only managed to get the one shot and then nearly keeled over because I’d been holding my breath! Yes who would have thought we’d miss having cold weather…

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